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Certavus was the champion fighter of the Ice Tribe who would go on to become a catalyst for the two Glatorian, Vastus and Gresh.


Early Life

Certavus fought in the Core War as a warrior for the Ice Tribe, and fought and taught multiple warriors. He once fought Zendra's team of Iron Wolves, and then, Surel, becoming a rival for the other Ice Tribe warrior.


Later, he began to teach Tarix on how he should be fighting, and helped to hold back Vastus and Kiina's offensive forces. Towards the end of the War, his body was ragged, and he was left for dead and all but forgotten in the final days.

Bara Magna

After the Shattering, Certavus eventually found his way to Iconox. He trained under Metus to refresh his skills and his battered body. He later fought Gelu on behalf of the Ice Tribe, and easily won. He continued to fight, never losing a battle.


On one occasion, he humiliated Kijori in front of a large group of others, and drove Kijori to hatred, and to a mockery.


He once dealt with an assassin in Vulcanus during a battle in the arena, and fought many times for the Ice Tribe. Towards the start of the Grand Tournament system, however, Certavus was dying.


His body was slowly being run ragged as a result of his continual uses of his strong repertoire, and to avoid many coming to challenge him, created a home in ruins in the desert. Only Metus knew where to find him, and the Agori remained his only true friend.


After writing down his theories in his book, the Book of Certavus, Certavus passed away as a result of the strain on his body. Metus cremated his body and armor later on.

Abilities and Traits

Certavus was a genius in the arena, and had a large repertoire of powerful techniques. He was honorable, only fighting for the Ice Tribe, a man of great courage and passion, and a genius in the arena.

Weapons

Certavus carried no weapon in battle, but used a blade in the Core War.

Book

Certavus wrote the "Book of Certavus", a book detailing his entire repertoire, a basic foreword of his life, and the theory of how many times each technique could be used before the user's body was too exhausted to continue. He never wrote the theory of the "Heaven's Disaster", however.